The many faces of *****-disciplinarity

Definitions of types of multiple disciplinaties

Women’s Studies is implicated in all these types of ****disciplinariness. Can we actually say that Women’s Studies is a discipline? Meta-discipline more like. This type of vagueness is not an easy fit in most of our Academies of Higher Education. Been struggling with this in trying to determine the information skills needed by students in WGSS. Requires an Interdisciplinary method for Information Literacy. Any ideas?

Recently added WGSS Books

Here are a few of the new titles which have arrived in the past few months.

Important note!See the most current list at  New WGSS books.

Smith, B. G. (2013). Women’s studies: The basics. London: Routledge.

Collingwood, S. L., Quintana, A. E., & Smith, C. J. (2012). Feminist cyberspaces: Pedagogies in transition. Newcastle: Cambridge Scholars.

Runyan, A. S. (2013). Feminist (im)mobilities in fortress(ing) North America: Rights, citizenships, and identities in transnational perspective. Farnham, Surrey: Ashgate.

Loomba, A., & Lukose, R. A. (2012). South Asian feminisms: Contemporary interventions. Durham: Duke University Press.

Herrin, J. (2013). Unrivalled influence: Women and empire in Byzantium. Princeton: Princeton University Press.

Liu, L. H., Karl, R. E., & Ko, D. (2013). The birth of Chinese feminism: Essential texts in transnational theory. New York: Columbia University Press.

Kronsell, A., & Svedberg, E. (2012). Making gender, making war: Violence, military and peacekeeping practices. New York, NY: Routledge.

Lacsamana, A. E. (2012). Revolutionizing feminism: The Philippine women’s movement in the age of terror. Boulder: Paradigm Publishers.

Fraser, N. (2013). Fortunes of feminism: From state-managed capitalism to neoliberal crisis.

Brown, H. A. (2012). Marx on gender and the family: A critical study. Leiden: Brill.

Chadwick, W. (2012). Women, art, and society. London: New York, N.Y.

Enke, A. (2012). Transfeminist perspectives in and beyond transgender and gender studies. Philadelphia: Temple University Press.

Phillips, L., & Cole, S. C. (2013). Contesting publics: Feminism, activism, ethnography.

Crawford, M. (2012). Transformations: Women, gender & psychology. New York: McGraw-Hill.

King, D. L., & Smith, C. L. (2012). Men who hate women and women who kick their asses: Stieg Larsson’s Millennium trilogy in feminist perspective. Nashville, Tenn: Vanderbilt University Press.

Gutiérrez, . M. G. (2012). Presumed incompetent: The intersections of race and class for women in academia. Boulder, Colo: University Press of Colorado.

Dziedzic, N. G. (2012). Feminism. Detroit: Greenhaven Press.

New WGSS books

Brooklyn Museum: Writing Women Back Into History

Wikipedia has a gender problem. Alexandra Thom is heading up a project to add entries and substance to Wikipedia on all the women included in Judy Chicago’s “The Dinner Party” which is permanently installed in the Sackler Gallery at the Brooklyn Museum of Art in New York. Not only are entries on the women of history lacking but female editors to Wikipedia are also much fewer than non-female. What’s up? It’s no surprise that men write mostly about men. Well, ladies, start your engines.

Thom writes, “The Dinner Party is an icon of feminist art, which features the names of 1,038 women in history…”

She found many of the names had only “stub” entries and almost 100 others had no mention at all. You can follow Alexandra’s project through the Brooklyn Museum blog starting with the two links below.

Brooklyn Museum: Community: bloggers@brooklynmuseum » Writing Women Back Into History.

Ending the ongoing cycle of omission

Bravo, Ms. Thom! Wikipedia is so heavily used by folks around the world. How many more women will your work inspire to become editors of Wikipedia to fill out this gross omission. I know I’m on board.

Dr. Sandra Harding speaking at UConn, 9/21/2011 at 4 p.m.

Dr. Sandra Harding to speak at Konover Auditorium

A talk by Dr. Sandra Harding

  • Scholar in feminist and postcolonial theory, epistemology, research methodology and philosophy of science.
  • Professor, Social Sciences & Comparative Education University of California – Los Angeles

Wednesday, September 21, 2011
4:00 – 5:30 PM
Konover Auditorium, Dodd Center, UConn – Storrs

Here is a passage from Dr. Harding’s 2009 article Postcolonial and feminist philosophies of science and technology: convergences and dissonances.
Postcolonial Studies, 12:4, 401-421.

Gender and science themes

From its beginnings, gender and science projects in the West pursued five main research trajectories. These were often initiated by groups with different kinds of disciplinary, political, or institutional interests in scientific and technological research. (1) Where are (and have been) women in the social structures of modern Western sciences, and why have there been so few of them in the arenas of the design and management of scientific and technological research? (2) How and why have ‘sexist sciences’ taken on projects of providing empirical support for the claimed inferiority of women? (3) How have technologies and the applications of the results of scientific research been used against women’s equality? Women’s health, reproductive, and environmental concerns were among the earliest such focuses. (4) How do scientific and technological education*pedagogy and curricula*restrict women’s development as scientists and engineers? (5) What is problematic about the epistemologies, methodologies, and philosophies of science that produce and support such sexist and androcentric practices?

These issues all remain important almost four decades later*unfortunately. In some areas significant progress has been made*for example, in increasing access for women to scientific educations, publications, organizations, lab and classroom jobs, and at least token presences in policy contexts. Moreover, significant changes in health and reproductive policies have occurred for women in already advantaged groups. Yet the changes have been mostly for the worse for women in Africa, South Asia, and other places around the globe. Today it is widely recognized that Western and especially US economic and political policies have greatly contributed to the increased threats to environments, health, and life itself experienced by the vast majority of the world’s citizens who are women, and their dependants (as well as adult men), around the globe. An important achievement of feminisms has been their development of epistemological and methodological approaches that deeply transform ‘the logic of scientific inquiry’ and its familiar regulative ideals. These approaches have been widely adopted in the social sciences and some fields of biology and medical research. Nevertheless, such feminist work has been largely marginalized in the mainstream science studies movements in the North. If they are not ‘studying women,’ these researchers seem to think that gender issues are irrelevant to both the worlds they examine and the assumptions guiding their own work.

A book signing and reception will take place in the Dodd Center Lobby immediately following Dr. Harding’s presentation. The Coop Bookstore will have copies of Dr. Harding’s books available for sale at the book signing.

These events are free and open to the public.

Sponsored by the Women’s Studies Program; the CLAS Fund for Innovation in Interdisciplinary Race, Eth-nicity, and Gender Studies; the Human Rights Institute; University of Connecticut Research Foundation; the Department of Philosophy; the Department of Sociology; and the Honors Program

For more information, please contact us at 860-486-3970 or wsinfo@uconn.edu.

Link to the full text of this article (for UConn affiliates).

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